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    Bird of the Week: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

    12:43 PM, Oct 17, 2013   |    comments
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    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Arkansas Game and Fish Comm.) -- This week we are talking about the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.

    On a walk through the forest you might spot rows of shallow holes in tree bark. In the East, this is the work of the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, an enterprising woodpecker that laps up the leaking sap and any trapped insects with its specialized, brush-tipped tongue. Attired sharply in barred black-and-white, with a red cap and (in males) throat, they sit still on tree trunks for long intervals while feeding.

    To find one, listen for their loud mewing calls or stuttered drumming. Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers are mostly black and white with boldly patterned faces. Both sexes have red foreheads, and males also have red throats. Look for a long white stripe along the folded wing. Bold black-and-white stripes curve from the face toward a black chest shield and white or yellowish underparts. Yellow-belled Sapsuckers perch upright on trees, leaning on their tails like other woodpeckers. They feed at sapwells-neat rows of shallow holes they drill in tree bark. They lap up the sugary sap along with any insects that may get caught there. Sapsuckers drum on trees and metal objects in a distinctive stuttering pattern.

    Backyard Tips:
    Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers aren't regular bird feeder visitors, although they may visit suet feeders. And if you have young birch or maple trees in your yard and you live in the sapsucker's range, you just might get to see one drilling its sapwells firsthand.

    This is the only completely migratory species of woodpecker in the Eastern U.S. They can be found in Arkansas from early September - late April.

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