• FEATURED:

    No DNA links Dr. Randeep Mann to grenades

    6:07 PM, Jul 20, 2010   |    comments
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    • FILED UNDER

    Tuesday prosecutors seemed to be tying up loose ends as testimony tackled a number of subjects.

    First - Dr. Mann's license to prescribe drugs.
    Testimony indicated he surrendered his DEA permit to prescribe controlled substances in July of 2006.
    And yet in March of 2009, when authorities discovered the grenades and weapons, they also discovered large amounts of Xanax and morphine sulphate in the Mann home.

    Prosecutors called the head of safety and security for the army ammunition plant in Milan, Tennessee.
    He testified the 98 grenades found buried outside dr. Mann's home were manufactured in 1975, and intended strictly for military use. How they got out of military hands is still unknown.

    But also on the stand was a DNA specialist.
    Todd Bille works for the ATF in Maryland. He examined the 98 grenades for any DNA left behind from handling.
    And though he did collect enough for a sample, it did not match Doctor Mann.

    Prosecutors then called a federal prisoner to the stand.
    Cecil Norwood told jurors he spoke to Mann in a holding cell for about ten minutes. And in that time Mann admitted he buried the grenades near his home because he knew he would be a person of interest in the bombing of Dr. Trent Pierce.

    Defense attorneys spent a lot of time in the afternoon attempting to discredit that prisoner's testimony, saying it was highly unlikely dr. Mann would have volunteered such information only ten minutes after meeting Norwood. 
     

     

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